Clevedon

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 The Blind Yeo is a man made channel constructed in 1949 to help alleviate flooding issues in the Kenn Valley.The new channel leading from the Kenn River runs for a distance of approximately 2.5 miles across the coastal clay belt. The outfall sluice is approximately 1 mile north of the once Kenn estuary.This camera was installed and is maintained by the Environment Agency and can be viewed here. All content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0. The camera looks at Clevedon Pill which  is a small harbour to the south of Clevedon at the mouth of the Blind Yeo. The name Clevedon derives from the Old English, cleve meaning "cleave" or "cleft" and don meaning "hill”. Wain's Hill is an univallate Iron Age hill fort situated approximately 1 mile south-west of Clevedon. The hill fort is defined by a steep, natural slope from the south and north with two ramparts to the east. The 1086 Domesday Book mentions Clevedon as a holding of a tenant-in-chief by the name of Mathew of Mortaigne, with eight villagers and ten smallholders. The parish of Clevedon formed part of the Portbury Hundred. Two small rivers, the Land Yeo and Middle Yeo, supported at least two mills. The Tuck Mills lay in the fields south of Clevedon Court and were used for fulling cloth. Other mills near Wain's Hill probably date from the early 17th century.