Keswick

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Many thanks to Kat's Kitchen for facilitating this camera's location. Kat’s Kitchen is located on Greta Bridge just opposite the Pencil Museum.  The building is the original shopfront for the long-gone Pencil Mill and harks back to Victorian times.  Outside you can sit and watch the ever-changing fells and or look for the Kingfisher that frequents the beck beside the café  Inside you’ll find a warm welcome and an array of home-baked treats, meals, smoothies, milkshakes along with freshly ground coffee using Cumbrian roasted beans.  Kat’s offers vegetarian, vegan and some gluten free options. The River Greta is a tributary of the River Derwent and flows through the town of Keswick. "Greta" derives from the Old Norse "Griótá", meaning "stony stream". The name is in records dating from the early 13th century, and also appears in Latinised form, as "Gretagila", at the time of Magna Carta. The source of the river is near Threlkeld, at the confluence of the River Glenderamackin and St. John's Beck. From there, the river runs westward, roughly aligned with the former Cockermouth, Keswick and Penrith Railway between Keswick and Penrith. The river subsequently flows through Keswick before joining the Derwent just after the latter flows out of Derwentwater. The medieval bridge over the river in Keswick was unusual in having two arches; on the great coach road from Kendal to Cockermouth all but two of the other bridges (Troutbeck and Portinscale) crossed their rivers in a single span. The current Greta Bridge in Keswick is another two-arch structure, built in 1926 (in the cam's shot).