Ashford Mill

View archive gallery
Square tr
Square tr
Square tr
Square tr
Square tr
Square tr
Square tr

Local Sponsors

More information

The River Isle is formed from head springs which rise on the western side of Wadeford which join with waters from Combe St Nicholas. It flows in a westerly direction past Pudleigh and Nimmer to reach Hornsbury Mill. After a short distance it turns in a northerly direction past Peasmarsh, Donyatt, Ilminster, Puckington, and Isle Abbotts, before joining the River Parrett just above Hambridge . The river flows for an approximate distance of 14 miles and in its first six miles it falls 250 feet, but then meanders sluggishly, with a fall of only 80 feet, to its confluence with the Parrett. On it’s journey from source to mouth it is joined by the tributaries, the River Ding and the Fivehead River with Venner’s Water, together with several un-named brooks, which drain the north-east flanks of the Blackdown Hills. On the north-west side the tributaries of the Dowlish Stream with Stretford Water and the Wall Brook drain Windwhistle Hill and Sprays Hill and the hill spur above Whitelackington. Approximately 1 mile before the rivers join with the Parrett it is joined by the Westport Canal. This camera was installed and is maintained by the Environment Agency and can be viewed here All  content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0. he usual range of the River Isle at Ashford Mill is between 0.08m and 1.30m. It has been between these levels for 90% of the time since monitoring began. The typical recent level of the River Isle at Ashford Mill over the past 12 months has been between 0.08m and 0.37m. It has been between these levels for at least 151 days in the past year. The highest level ever recorded at the River Isle at Ashford Mill is 2.20m, reached on Saturday 13th December 2008 at 9:30am. Puckington is a village and civil parish, situated 10 miles  south-east of Taunton and 10 miles west of Yeovil. Before the Norman Conquest the manor was held under Muchelney Abbey but after 1066 was taken over by Roger de Courcelles. It was subsequently held by a succession of families until the execution of the Duke of Suffolk in 1553 when it reverted to the Crown, and sold to the Portmans of Orchard Portman.