Lovington

View archive gallery
Square tr
Square tr
Square tr
Square tr
Square tr
Square tr
Square tr

Local Sponsors

More information

The River Brue originates in the parish of Brewham in Somerset, England, and reaches the sea some 31 miles west at Burnham-on-Sea. It originally took a different route from Glastonbury to the sea, but this was changed by Glastonbury Abbey in the twelfth century. The river provides an important drainage route for water from a low-lying area which is prone to flooding which man has tried to manage through rhynes, canals, artificial rivers and sluices for centuries. The Brue Valley Living Landscape is an ecological conservation project based on the Somerset Levels and Moors and managed by the Somerset Wildlife Trust. The valley includes several Sites of Special Scientific Interest including Westhay Moor, Shapwick Heath and Shapwick Moor. Much of the area has been at the centre of peat extraction on the Somerset Levels. The Brue Valley Living Landscape project commenced in January 2009 to restore and reconnect habitat that will support wildlife. The aim is to be able to sustain itself in the face of climate change while guaranteeing farmers and other landowners can continue to use their land profitably. It is one of an increasing number of landscape scale conservation projects in the UK. This camera was installed and is maintained by the Environment Agency and can be viewed here. All content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0. Lovington is a village and civil parish in Somerset, England, situated 3 miles south west of Castle Cary, between the River Brue and River Cary, in the South Somerset district. The name of the village comes from Old English meaning Lufa's settlement.  There was a mill on the River Brue in the village at the time of the Domesday Book, when it was held by Serlo de Burci, however it is not certain whether this is the same site as the current Lovington Mill which was built around 1800. The parish of Lovington was part of the hundred of Catsash, while Wheathill was part of the Whitley Hundred. The village school was built in the early 19th century, and was helped later in the century, with donations and equipment, by the local priest and hymn writer Godfrey Thring.