Langworth

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Barlings Eau is a small a tributary of the River Witham, joining it near Short Ferry. It acts as the central spine for a number of other small rivers, which drain the low-lying land to either side. Most of its course is within the area managed by the Witham Third District IDB, an Internal Drainage Board responsible for land drainage. One of their pumping stations is on the banks of the river. There is also an Environment Agency pumping station, which is used to pump water from the River Witham system to the River Ancholme, to maintain flows and water quality when required. Langworth has two public houses and two garages. Langworth railway station, on the Great Central Railway Grimsby to Lincoln line, has closed, but the line still runs through the village, crossing the A158. The village is in an area prone to flooding. The Environment Agency gives flood warnings for the Barlings Eau waterway, which runs just north-west of the village. Particularly extensive flooding occurred in 2007.  This camera was installed and is maintained by the Environment Agency and can be viewed here. All content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0  Langworth church is dedicated to St Hugh. The church is a 1960–62 rebuilding, by Haynes and Johnson of Brigg, of the Walmsgate Hall chapel, itself built in 1901. The material from the original chapel could not be used although the previous footprint was kept, and lengthened. Retained from the earlier chapel was the barrel vault roof construction, the surrounds to the windows, and sliding doors with their handles at the west end. Also the original font, organ, altar canopy and bronze lamps, and a plaque to Dallas-Yorke, son of Thomas Yorke, to whom the chapel was a memorial, remain. Plaster decoration, part Art Nouveau, part Pre-Raphaelite style, was lost in the rebuilding; Pevsner's view was that with the decoration 'the chapel was one of the outstanding ensembles in England of the style of 1900.