Yeovil Pen Mill

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The River Yeo, also known as the River Ivel is a tributary of the River Parrett in north Dorset and south Somerset. The river's names derive from the Celtic river-name gifl 'forked river'. The name Yeo appears to have been influenced by Old English ēa 'river'. The river rises in southern Somerset, in the North Dorset Downs region. It flows through the town of Sherborne and Sherborne Lake in north Dorset, and the Somerset towns of Yeovil, Yeovilton and Ilchester, to which it gives its name, and joins the River Parrett near Langport. For a few miles east of Yeovil, it forms the county boundary between Somerset and Dorset. The river is navigable for light craft for 8 miles  from the Parrett to Ilchester. The Yeo's tributaries include the River Gascoigne, which rises near Milborne Wick and joins the Yeo near Sherborne, the River Wriggle, Trent Brook, Hornsey Brook, the River Cam and Bearley Brook.  This camera was installed and is maintained by the Environment Agency and can be viewed here All  content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0.
The Yeovil Pen Mill railway station was opened by the Great Western Railway (GWR) as part of the Wilts, Somerset and Weymouth route on 2 February 1854. The GWR opened a locomotive depot at the station in September 1856, which operated until January 1959, when it was closed and the locomotives transferred to Yeovil Town depot. Bristol and Exeter Railway line from Taunton, initially terminating at Yeovil Town, had been extended to connect with the GWR at Yeovil Pen Mill from 2 February 1857. In June 1874, both these lines (GWR and B&ER) were converted from their original broad gauge to what had become the standard gauge. A connection between the GWR line and the Southern Railway line to Exeter was established during World War II to allow trains direct access between Yeovil Junction and Yeovil Pen Mill. This was opened on 13 October 1943 and offered a new route for trains of war materials as well as a diversion route in the event of bomb damage.