Midford

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Midford Brook is a small river in Somerset. It is formed by convergence of the Wellow Brook and Cam Brook at Midford. It passes Tucking Mill and joins the River Avon close to the Dundas Aqueduct and the remains of the Somerset Coal Canal. For its entire length it defines the boundary between Bath & North East Somerset and Wiltshire. This camera was installed and is maintained by the Environment Agency and can be viewed here. All content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0. The Midford Brook has a catchment area of 147.4 km2 which is largely over impermeable Lias. The deep steep-sided valley means that it responds rapidly to rainfall. The usual range of the Midford Brook at Midford is between 0.50m and 2.90m. It has been between these levels for 90% of the time since monitoring began. The typical recent level of the Midford Brook at Midford over the past 12 months has been between 0.45m and 2.20m. It has been between these levels for at least 150 days in the past year. The highest level ever recorded at the Midford Brook at Midford is 3.61m, reached on Thursday 11th July 1968 at 8:00am. In the village, straddling the B3110 road, is the disused viaduct of the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway and close by are the remains of a lesser viaduct that once carried the Somerset Coal Canal, and later the Great Western branch line from Limpley Stoke to Hallatrow. Midford railway station, on the S&DJR line served the village until 1966. That line is now on the route of NCR 24, the Colliers Way. Bristol and North Somerset Railway bridge over Midford Brook The Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway passes over the Bristol and North Somerset Railway's viaduct on an even taller viaduct. For about four years from 1911 to 1915, Midford had a second railway station: Midford Halt railway station on the Limpley Stoke to Camerton railway that followed the former Somerset Coal Canal. At Camerton it made an end-on junction with a branch from Hallatrow on the former Bristol & North Somerset Railway. The line was open to passenger traffic for only seven years in all, from 1910 to 1915, and from 1923 to 1925. Midford Halt opened a year late and then did not reopen for the second period.