West Luccombe

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The River Horner, also known as Horner Water, rises near Luccombe on Exmoor and flows past Porlock into Porlock Bay near Hurlstone Point on the Bristol Channel.The river flows into the sea though a shingle ridge at Bossington beach, where it forms part of the Porlock Ridge and Saltmarsh Site of Special Scientific Interest. When the river level is very high, flood water builds up behind the ridge, causing it to breach. Evidence that the river was previously diverted to power iron workings has been found. The remains of an iron hammer mill and 55m long, breached, embankment dam were excavated alongside the river in 1996. This camera was installed and is maintained by the Environment Agency and can be viewed here. All content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0.  The usual range of the Horner Water at West Luccombe is between 0.04m and 0.65m. It has been between these levels for 90% of the time since monitoring began. The typical recent level of the Horner Water at West Luccombe over the past 12 months has been between 0.05m and 0.25m. It has been between these levels for at least 150 days in the past year. The highest level ever recorded at the Horner Water at West Luccombe is 1.13m, reached on Monday 30th October 2000 at 4:45am. The name Luccombe is believed to mean either Lufa's valley or valley where the counting was done. Locumbe in 1086 Domesday book. There is evidence of Iron Age field systems on the top of Great Hill,[3] and the Sweetworthy Iron Age hill fort. At the time of the Domesday Book in 1086 East Luccombe was held by Ralph de Limesy passing by the 13th century to the Luccombe family, and later to the Arundell family. Along with West Luccombe these passed to the Acland family. Luccombe was part of the hundred of Carhampton. In 1944 Sir Richard Acland gave the Holnicote Estate, which includes Luccombe, to the National Trust.